Find the Best Business Credit Cards

Build credit. Cover cash flow. Earn rewards...
Whatever the reason, every business owner needs a business credit card in their pocket. Compare the best small business credit cards, from our partners and others, below.

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Fundera receives compensation from American Express. This compensation impacts how and where its products appear on this site.
American Express Business Gold Rewards Charge Card

American Express Business Gold Rewards Charge Card

Applyon American Express's secure website. Terms apply.
ANNUAL FEE

$175

REWARDS

1, 2, or 3 points

SIGN UP BONUS

50,000 points

MINIMUM CREDIT

Good (620+)

See Details
American Express Blue for Business® Card

American Express Blue for Business® Card

Applyon American Express's secure website. Terms apply.
ANNUAL FEE

None

REWARDS

1, 2, or 10 points

SIGN UP BONUS

25,000 points

MINIMUM CREDIT

Good (620+)

See Details
American Express SimplyCash® Plus Business Credit Card

American Express SimplyCash® Plus Business Credit Card

Applyon American Express's secure website. Terms apply.
ANNUAL FEE

None

REWARDS

1%, 3%, or 5% cash back

SIGN UP BONUS

$400

MINIMUM CREDIT

Good (620+)

See Details
American Express Business Platinum Charge Card®

American Express Business Platinum Charge Card®

Applyon American Express's secure website. Terms apply.
ANNUAL FEE

$450

REWARDS

1, 1.5, or 2 points

SIGN UP BONUS

75,000 points

MINIMUM CREDIT

Good (620+)

See Details
Gold Delta SkyMiles® Business Credit Card

Gold Delta SkyMiles® Business Credit Card

Applyon American Express's secure website. Terms apply.
ANNUAL FEE

$95

REWARDS

1 or 2 points

SIGN UP BONUS

30,000 miles + $50

MINIMUM CREDIT

Good (620+)

See Details
Business credit cards resources icon

How to Find the Best Business Credit Card For You

When you’re picking out the best small business credit cards, there are some obvious factors: their APR, credit limit, and fees. But it’s also important to think about your specific business and what its unique needs might be—and match those up with the right business credit card.

Do you travel for work? Look at cards with airfare and hotel perks. Do you need to fund startup costs? Focus on credit limit and low promotional APR. Do you deal with longer or irregular payments? Most cards have 30-day billing cycles, but not all. Do you carry out business internationally? Pay attention to the foreign transaction fee and other hidden charges for purchases outside the country.

Why You Need a Business Credit Card

Whether you’ve just started a small business or you’ve been at the helm for some time, a business credit card can come in handy. It gives you easy access to a revolving line of credit, which you can use for purchases or cash withdrawals—when you need them, without hassle or delay.

Like with consumer credit cards, small business credit cards need to be used wisely. Otherwise, you might get caught up with unnecessary debt or tarnish your credit score.

Here are some smart ways to use a business credit card if you're looking to improve your business.

(We’ll go more in-depth with business charge cards, too, but keep in mind that these 6 strategies apply to both.)

1

Simplify Your Bookkeeping

Having a business credit card will separate your personal and business expenses—making life way easier at tax time. If you use the card for routine purchases, you can easily track, categorize, and analyze your expenses through your monthly statements.

2

Provide a Cash Flow Cushion

Does your cash flow ever lag from a decrease in sales or a delay in payments? A small business credit card would let you pay expenses and make purchases—stretching your dollars without dipping into your cash flow.

Need help keeping track of your cash flow? Download our free cash flow statement template.

3

Breathe Easy with Higher Credit Limits

If your business tends to have high monthly expenses, or you have a startup trying to gain steam, then business credit cards with high credit limits will increase your purchasing power… And your potential for growth.

4

Establish and Improve Your Business Credit

There’s an easy way to build your business credit responsibly: small business credit cards. Just pay your bills on time, keep your balance manageable, and stay within your credit limit—and before you know it, that business credit score will rise. Think of it as an investment towards the best business credit cards and business loans.

5

Take Advantage of Rewards and Perks

Don’t forget about those rewards, bonuses, and perks that come with business credit cards! Most small business credit cards offer higher cash back rewards than consumer cards do, alongside bonuses on typical business buys like office supplies, gas, travel, and restaurant bills.

Your business credit card will have some perks you can take advantage of to save money—no matter what your business is. It’s smart to use it on regular expenses so your reward points add up faster.

6

Make Online Purchases

Most of your transactions probably take place online, and business credit cards are just the easiest way to make that happen. Not everyone deals with PayPal and ACH—but credit cards are accepted by everyone. Rack up rewards, separate your business and personal expenses, and build business credit by moving your online purchases onto your small business credit card.

Here are some other factors to consider:

1

Length of Grace Period

Understanding your business credit card’s billing cycle, and the specific day that cycle closes, will let you make use of the maximum number of days you can pay the bill without being charged interest. That’s called your grace period, and it’s key to owning a credit card—especially if you’re using it as a loan, or for large purchases.

2

Fees vs. Rewards

Though you can easily find business credit cards without an annual fee, your business might actually benefit enough from those great rewards that the fee is a worthwhile expense.

3

Commonly Accepted Cards

Before deciding, be sure you know which small business credit cards your supplies accept! Though Visa, American Express, and MasterCard are common, your vendors might not accept them all.

4

Credit Reporting

Double-check that your business credit card issuer reports your payment data to a business credit reporting agency—like Dun & Bradstreet, Equifax, or Experian. This will help you build your business credit record.

By the same token, make sure the credit card company won’t report that information to consumer credit agencies, which would cause your business credit card to appear on your personal credit report. To protect your personal credit and to establish your business credit on its own, you’ll want to keep those records separate.

Some credit card companies only report business activities on your personal credit report if the business is delinquent or the account is in default—so be aware.

What About Business Charge Cards?

If you’re shopping around for credit options, don’t overlook business charge cards. Depending on your financial strategies and the structure of your small business, a business charge card might be more up your alley than a business credit card.

Like business credit cards, business charge cards extend lines of credit to users. They also have similar rewards, perks, annual fees, and foreign transaction fees.

There are two things that set them apart in a big way, though:

No Preset Spending Limit

Unlike business credit cards, which usually have preset spending limits based on your personal and business finances, business charge cards don’t come with preset spending limits. With a business charge card, you’ll have the flexibility to make large purchases without reaching your limit or restricting yourself a little down the line.

While it's possible that your charge card issuer might add a spending limit if your payment history and purchase habits seem concerning, this almost never happens. If you're a responsible borrower, you've got nothing to worry about.

Also, your rewards directly correlate with your spending—and since you have no preset spending limit with a charge card, there’s nothing stopping you from essentially using that rewards system as a secondary revenue stream of sorts.

Balance and Interest

While business credit cards let you roll your balance over from month to month, building interest along the way, business charge cards need to be paid in full every month. If you miss a payment, you’ll get charged a hefty late fee—typically 3% of the balance—and risk getting your line of credit suspended.

On the flipside, because you’re (ideally) paying in full each month, you won’t need to deal with interest on your expenses, surprise fees, or outstanding debt.

Business Credit Cards vs. Business Charge Cards

The type of card you choose should be based on how you intend to use it, what you’re comfortable with, and how your small business works.

If you don’t mind having a spending limit and you’re not sure you’ll be able to pay your balance in full each month, then a business credit card is a good choice. There’s the safety net of rolling over your monthly payments—though it’s accompanied by growing interest—and a diversity of choice in the cards and companies available.

But if you prefer the flexibility of no preset spending limit – letting you make large purchases without having to worry about your cap, and you’re confident you’ll pay the balance in full each month, then a business charge card might be for you. A charge card will also promote good spending habits, help you improve your business credit score, and often comes with substantial rewards.

Using a Business Credit Card or Business Charge Card as a Loan

It’s best to use small business credit cards and charge cards for your monthly expenses and working capital needs, since they basically function as revolving lines of credit with high interest costs.

However, there are definitely some advantages to seeing a business credit card or charge card as a kind of small business loan instead. You can look to your card when you...

Need a Quick Loan

Applying for a small business loan can take a while—so a business credit card or business charge card is a good option if you’re in need of a quick turnaround. It’s also an alternative to look into if you can’t turn to a bank or the SBA.

Need Flexibility

Business credit cards give you the freedom to borrow as much or as little as you need each month—within the credit limit—and use those funds however you like. Business charge cards don’t have a preset spending limit, making them even more flexible.

Lack Collateral

You don’t need collateral to apply for or use small business credit cards or business charge cards. So, if you don’t want to risk your assets—or don’t have any to begin with!—you can still borrow from your credit card or charge card.

However, you may need to sign a personal guarantee, but more on that later.

Want to Take Advantage of 0% APR

Just imagine what you can do with that introductory 0% APR for your business. Plus, if you have existing balances on other business credit cards, you can transfer them over.

But remember — it’s an introductory rate, so make sure you can pay the balance before that rate spikes. Also, you might need a certain credit score to qualify for the promotional rate in the first place, so research your business credit card options closely.

Applying for a Business Credit Card or Business Charge Card

The application process for business credit cards or business charge cards is similar to that of consumer credit cards. Check your credit report first—as that’s an important factor—and look for any errors in order to improve your score.

Also, check out these steps to improve your credit score.

When applying for a small business credit card or charge card, make sure you have the following information on hand:

When applying for a small business credit card or charge card, make sure you have the following information on hand:

  • Business name and location
  • Tax identification number (EIN)
  • Business's financial information
  • Your Social Security Number (SSN)

You might also want to look into applying for additional cards for your employees. Each employee may need to fill out a separate application, but they’re not required to act as personal guarantors. Some cards allow you to set different credit limits for employee cards, too.

Signing a Personal Guarantee

Nearly all business credit cards or charge cards require a personal guarantee from the business owner. As a small business owner, you’ll inevitably get tied to your business by banks—and because small business credit cards and charge cards don’t require collateral, your personal guarantee gives card issuers a measure of security in case your business fails.

There are a few ways to avoid making a personal guarantee, though you’ll need to have an established corporation or LLC with good credit history.

  • Some cards waive the guarantee if you have more than $5 million in annual sales.
  • If you’re on time with your payments and have an excellent credit rating, you can apply to release your business from a personal guarantee on an existing business credit card.

Keeping Tabs on Your Business Credit Score

Your business credit score is similar to your personal credit score, except it measures your company’s creditworthiness instead. Banks and lenders—and especially the Small Business Administration—will look at your business credit score when considering you for a loan or line of credit.

As we discussed, small business credit cards and business credit cards are a great way to develop your business credit history. Here are a few common questions—and answers—about business credit.

What's the Range?

  • 80-100: Low risk of late payments
  • 50-79: Medium risk of late payments
  • 0-49: High risk of late payments

How Is It Determined?

The three major credit bureaus (Experian, Equifax and Dun & Bradstreet) use different methods to determine creditworthiness—like timeliness of payments, years in business, lines of credit, collection amounts, and percentage of available credit used—but each of them analyzes data only from your business, not personal accounts.

Unlike your personal credit reports, your business credit reports aren’t free. Here’s what they cost:

Do's and Don'ts of Business Credit Cards and Charge Cards

Phew — you’ve absorbed a lot about business credit cards and charge cards. By now you might’ve realized that they come in handy for small business owners. But with the plastic in your pocket, it’s especially important to be a responsible borrower and business owner. Follow these rules and you should avoid the most common pitfalls.

  • Never Mix Business and Personal Expenses

    This motto remains the core of small business financial management. A small business credit card or charge card helps keep you and your business separate, so don’t blur the line by making personal purchases with your business card or transferring a personal credit card balance to your business credit card.

  • Don't Take on Too Much Debt

    Your small business credit card is a great tool, but don’t make the mistake of overextending your business. Keep an eye on your debt-to-cash and debt-to-available-credit-limit ratios. Even if you have a charge card, with no spending preset limit, stay honest with yourself so that you won't spend more than you can repay.

  • Monitor Interest Rates

    Closely monitor the interest rates on your credit card. Though most card issuers give you notice before increasing the rate, you’re ultimately responsible for keeping an eye on it—and factoring it into your budget. (Note that charge cards don't have interest rates! Do watch out for any changes to your late fees, though.)

  • Deduct Interest Rates

    Speaking of interest rates, don’t forget that the interest you paid on your business credit card is tax-deductible!

  • Make Regular Payments

    Pay off your balance on time and in full, whenever possible, to avoid interest altogether.

  • Only Charge the Essentials

    Treat your business credit card like a loan and only take what you need. Remember, it’s basically a line of credit—so use it for revenue-generating investments like equipment or inventory, and never for payroll or debt consolidation.

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