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6 Things Your Small Business Can Do to Survive the Summer (As Told by GIFs)

Ben Rashkovich

Ben Rashkovich

Content Strategy Manager at Fundera
Ben is the resident wordsmith and grammar guru at Fundera. He makes sure their top-notch content stays accessible, interesting, and useful for small business owners. Previously, Ben wrote for the Columbia Spectator and eBay's curatorial team.
Ben Rashkovich

Lemonade stands aren’t the only small businesses who can capitalize on the coming season.

Here’s how you can get a jump on summertime and take advantage of this season’s opportunities for promotions, community engagement, hiring, and (of course) personal down-time.

1. Step away.

Got this one here.

You deserve a break! If it feels difficult or impossible to tear yourself away from your business, it might be time to hire help or delegate a few duties.

2. Get that vacation on lock.

Got this one here.

If summer travel is in your future, get those reservations on the books—and make your vacation dates clear to clients, customers, and employees.

3. Brace yourself for tourists, travellers, and out-of-school families.

Got this one here.

If your business provides seasonal products or services, summertime means a boost in business. Make sure you’ve prepped your seasonal promotions, customer service, and operating hours accordingly.

4. Re-energize that business plan.

Got this one here.

With tax season behind you and fall holidays still months away, summer is the perfect time to take a fresh look at your expenses and dream up new opportunities.

5. Hire a student for the summer.

Got this one here.

Give a young person the opportunity to earn valuable job experience and give yourself the opportunity to become a mentor!

6. Connect with your community.

Got this one here.

How can you bring your business to local festivals or events this summer? You don’t have to sell to participate—look for ways you can volunteer or pitch in as a sponsor.

Editorial Note: Any opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved, or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.
Ben Rashkovich

Ben Rashkovich

Content Strategy Manager at Fundera
Ben is the resident wordsmith and grammar guru at Fundera. He makes sure their top-notch content stays accessible, interesting, and useful for small business owners. Previously, Ben wrote for the Columbia Spectator and eBay's curatorial team.
Ben Rashkovich

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